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  • Behind the Scenes
  • Meditating on the Word

    Interview with Josh Yeoh

    What does it mean to meditate on God’s word?

    It means to slow down the reading pace, to prayerfully contemplate every word and every phrase, looking for deeper and fuller meanings. Meditation is the art of digging out the most that we can from each and every word.

    So often we read the Word as if we’re doing a workout – reading plans, checklists, and such. The art of meditation is what really unlocks the riches of the Word. It means to not take things at face value, but dialoguing with the Lord about it. Each verse or passage is a doorway into encounter with God; it’s an expression of Who God is.

    Meditation on the Word is the key to the often-asked question: How do I hear God? The same way He has been speaking since we’ve had the Word of God! It causes us to know Him more and hear Him better. How far or deep should we go?

     

    Why is meditating on and studying the word important in our spiritual walk? Does it practically benefit us?

    Joshua 1:8 says, “This Book of the Law shall not depart from your mouth, but you shall meditate on it day and night, so that you may be careful to do according to all that is written in it. For then you will make your way prosperous, and then you will have good success.” Every tool for succeeding in life is within His Word.

    The Written Word of God is revealed by the Living Word of God through the power of the Holy Spirit of God. Proverbs 2:6 says, “For the Lord gives wisdom; from his mouth come knowledge and understanding.” The source of illumination is the mouth of God. Meditation made me feel like Aladdin entering the cave of wonders; there’s so much more! There’s a difference between looking at a photo of Niagara Falls and actually standing before the roaring waterfall – that’s how it is to read a book that God wrote and commune with the Holy Spirit that inspired it.

    There is a cry across the body for intimacy. There can be no intimacy without conversation and communion. If we truly love God, we will love who He is, not who we think He is. If we only love the idea of a God that we create in our minds, it’s at best, fantasy, and at worst, idolatry! Meditating and studying the Word is a way of conversing with God – with the ultimate goal of knowing God – is the doorway into such intimacy.

    Luke 6:45 says, “The good person out of the good treasure of his heart produces good, and the evil person out of his evil treasure produces evil, for out of the abundance of the heart his mouth speaks.” Meditating on the Word is how we slowly transform our ‘inner well’, so that we are depositing ‘good treasure’; so that what comes out in our speech, thoughts, and behaviour is Christ-like.

    Proverbs 16:26 says, “A worker’s appetite works for him; his mouth urges him on.” We labour because of hunger. Similarly, as we meditate more and go deeper, we get addicted; hungry for more revelation!

     

    How should we do it? Are there any action steps we can use?

    Have a sheet of paper or journal where you write your meditations. Also, have a column or separate piece of paper. Your mind will likely wander to other things, such as to-do’s. This separate section is where you pen down all your stray thoughts, so that you can push it out of your mind for the moment without the additional thought-traffic. You can then proceed with a clear mind.

    You may combine pray-reading the Word with meditating on the word. Theology must lead to doxology. The study of God must lead to the worship of God. Here are some practical handles you may find useful:

    • Write down one or two verses that you will be focusing on.
    • Slow the pace way down. As you read, meditate on each word or phrase. For example, in ‘How lovely is your dwelling place, Lord Almighty!’ (Psalm 84:1), take time to meditate on ‘how lovely’. Why ‘lovely’, not ‘awesome’? God is intentional with His word choices. There are so many layers of what He wants to reveal. Where is His ‘dwelling place’? How do we get there? Think of it as sitting down with your favourite author over a coffee, and asking them about their inspiration for this or that character, or idea.
    • Study the word / phrase:
      • Context: verses that precede and follow. David Pawson said: “A text out of context is a pretext.” We sometimes apply a verse out of context and it becomes false or inaccurate. Look for what’s before and after, in that book.
      • Look up word meanings; translations; lexicons at BibleHub.com or apps such as Blue Letter Bible. There are sometimes layers we miss.
      • Cross-reference it with word studies online.
      • Where there’s repetition, ask: What is its meaning? Why is it there?
      • Symbolism: What do they represent? Any deeper spiritual meanings?
    • Speak, pray, and sing the scriptures back to the Lord.
    • Do it in the context of Worship.
  • Behind the Scenes
  • Our Light Has Come: The Heart Behind the Album

    by Alarice

    “Arise, shine for your light has come, and the glory of the Lord rises upon you.
    See darkness covers the earth and thick darkness is over the peoples,
    But the Lord rises upon you and his glory appears over you.
    Nations will come to your light, and kings to the brightness of your dawn”

    – Isaiah 60:1-3

    It was the 27th of January 2018. We were gathered in Changi Cove, Isaiah 60:1-3 resounding in our hearts, our minds locked together, fitting together the puzzle pieces of what we knew was to be a powerful prophetic song. It took 8 songwriters to finally piece this song together in a way that we felt best captured the message that was beating in our hearts, both lyrically and melodically.

    I love how it took a team; the ‘Body’; a ‘family’ to unlock the pathways that would ultimately culminate in the creation of not only this song, but of several others. The song was indeed birthed out of community; a community that loves Jesus and were ready to listen and attune themselves to His heart.

    This was just a glimpse of the journey of what we’ve seen released today as the fruit of labour by a family, a Body of Christ – the release of Awaken Generation’s first full length album, “Our Light Has Come”. More than just the songwriting process, there were the long hours of arranging, creating musical layers and dynamics, and working out the sorts of instrumentations that would best communicate and carry the message of the song. Then there were the many rehearsals that required grit and precision to ensure that what was imagined could effectively be brought to life in an accurate and sharpened manner.

    There were the divine appointments of kindred hearts that sacrificially offered their resources and talents to execute this vision, and many hours of prayer-walking and intercession – because we all knew that this album was not unto ourselves, but a greater purpose of awakening an entire generation unto Him.

    Perhaps the process of the album itself was just a little reflection of what it means to “arise and shine” – to step out, to use our gifts and offer our ‘little’ pieces to a big God who is more than able to pull it all together; to multiply our Hallelujahs.

    Perhaps we are to simply live in the reality of this scripture, now that we are living in the era where Jesus has already been given to us and where His Holy Spirit is being poured out across the earth onto the young and old to prophesy, dream dreams, and see visions (Acts 2:17). And as we live out that purpose, may all the nations “come to your light, and kings to the brightness of your dawn”.

  • Behind the Scenes
  • Life As an AG Student

    by Serene Lim, Songwriting Student

    I didn’t know quite what to expect as I began the process of relocating back to Singapore after having lived away for more than five years. Some of the questions going through my mind were: What godly communities could I be a part of? Could I do anything about my music skills this season? What is Father God doing in Singapore and the region?

    I certainly hadn’t heard of AG while overseas. When I returned, two sisters separately shared a link to AG with me. As I pored through the AG website and watched video snippets of who and what AG was about, I felt something or Someone tug my heartstrings.

    Allow me to share three thoughts as I reflect on my journey as an AG student.

    Excellent Craftsmen

    Speaking of hunger – supper after AG with classmates discussing chord formations!

    I am both humbled and impressed by the quality of the curriculum taught at AG. Our year-long course has been interlaced with solid technical skills training, suited to various types of learning, offering plenty of space for self-discovery and expression.

    We are privileged to be taught by a group of high-calibre Mentors and guests who are successful in their careers, not holding back with sharing the highlights and ‘lowlights’ of their own journey. I’ve been touched by their hearts for God, the nations, and for us students.

    Servant Leaders

    A goofy moment with our Songwriting Mentors!

    The AG core team and Student Mentors are a truly special group. It seems like each of them was finely curated and handpicked to lead here. They teach, impart, and impact with authority and humility. And we never forget to have fun in the process; that’s important for all of us who live down-to-earth, and yet are also heaven-dwellers!

    Our leaders and Mentors have exceptionally well-honed music skills, reminding me of Proverbs 22:29: “Do you see a man who excels in his work? He will stand before kings; He will not stand before unknown men.” It is however, never primarily about the technical skills in AG, although we are not ashamed to say we pursue Excellence with every ounce in us. It is always, first about the condition of our hearts. This combination of heart and hands is rare and highly attractive.

    Dream Big

    Walking out our destiny together.

    Destiny is the theme of the AG’s 2018 cohort. By saying yes to God and AG, I feel like I have taken more steps into my God-given destiny. One phrase that has been etched in my heart: ‘Songs have the power to transform nations’. As we dare to believe in the goodness of our Father God to release through us – His little ones – new songs and new sounds, unique in the ways He has formed us, He will absolutely do more than we can ask or imagine.

    I also see all my classmates creating ripples and waves in their own spheres as the River of Life flows through us. I cherish the friendships formed amongst us, in the midst of all the joy and laughter, tears and fears. As we encourage and cheer one another on, these relationships have transcended church lines, age groups, family backgrounds, and all other differences.

    I’ve counted the cost of being a part of AG – the weekly commitment and commute after a hectic day’s work, school fees, stepping out of my comfort zone in ways more than one, the frustrations in the midst of sharpening my craft… But it has all been absolutely worth it, hands down.

    We graduate from AG in a month’s time. I was surprised to feel like I already miss my year in AG, looking back on it with much fondness.

    Week after week, we end class with our musical brain and spirit filled to the brim. I often feel there is a release of creativity and courage in our craft. We leave inspired to grow to be the very best in who we are as sons and daughters of God, and in what we do as worshippers and songwriters.

    I end with this: Sow and invest into the musical gifts God has placed in you. As we walk with the AG community, we are growing and maturing into fullness together, as a family!

  • Behind the Scenes
  • Breaking Out of the ‘Pai-seh’ Culture

    By Sabrina Ng

    We’ve all been there before, that dreaded ‘Who wants to lead the prayer?’, and in almost telepathic unison, pairs of shifty eyes start darting downwards and bodies start sliding down in their chairs towards the floor.

    I may exaggerate but I’m sure we all know it to be true in one way or another. And if you’re wondering what I’m trying to get at with that illustration; in our local Singaporean lexicon, we call it ‘pai-seh’.

    In proper English, to feel pai-seh is to experience feelings of shyness and/or embarrassment. It is perfectly normal to encounter situations where we can’t help feeling that way − but to be pai-seh regarding our faith and calling, this stems from something much deeper.

     

    The Fear of Man

    What exactly is this pai-seh that is so rampant in our society, and what does the Bible say about it? Essentially, the ‘spirit’ of pai-seh is the fear of man. Pai-seh is not biblical, and will hinder us from fulfilling our destinies.

    ‘For am I now seeking the approval of man, or of God?
    Or am I trying to please man?
    If I were still trying to please man, I would not be a servant of Christ.’
    – Galatians 1:10

    In church, many shy away when asked to lead a prayer, a song in worship, or take up a leadership role, thinking that they’re not good enough, that they would be judged by the level of their skill; this is pai-seh at play.

    When we allow this fear to take precedence in our lives, we succumb to thoughts of intimidation, insecurity, inferiority, and inadequacy. And if we let negative thoughts and fears consume us, we hinder ourselves from fulfilling all that God has called us to be, and robbing ourselves of the blessings we could otherwise have.

    Who are we trying to please? As Christians, we need to be more concerned about God’s business than other people’s opinions (including our own!) Remember, we are created in God’s image for His glory and to glorify Him. And being created in His image, we have been predestined as sons and daughters, called according to His purpose – there is no excuse to say that we are not worthy.

    ‘Such confidence as this is ours through Christ before God.
    Not that we are competent in ourselves to claim anything for ourselves,
    but our competence comes from God.’
    – 2 Corinthians 3:4-5

    Through Jesus Christ, we have already been given the confidence to walk in the calling that God has for each one of us. So what if we don’t have the best singing voice or are only able to pray five sentences? It has never been about being the best; God looks at the heart – at our sincerity and authenticity. Practice will make perfect, but ultimately, God is more concerned with our progress than our perfection.

     

    A PK’s Journey

    No one is exempt from the spirit of pai-seh and I’ve come a long way in my own journey of overcoming it. In my teens, I became acutely aware of the weight of expectation placed on me as a PK (pastor’s kid). Though I liked singing, I shied away from the spotlight, preferring to fade into the background (literally hidden behind a pillar) as a keyboardist on the worship team.

    As the years went by, the need for worship leaders in my church arose and I reluctantly agreed to step in to fill the gap. The initial period was challenging and I frequently questioned my own abilities. I was much happier just serving Him behind the piano; there were many people more spiritually mature, more musically talented than me who could probably do a better job, why would God make my life so difficult? Why would He set me up (the pastor’s daughter, no less!) to fail in front of so many people?

    Yet, in spite of my self-doubt and regret, there were occasions when I experienced glimmers of joy while leading worship, and they shone like diamonds in the darkness. God was impressing upon me the call He placed on my life, assuring me of the gifts He has given me to fulfil it. Slowly but surely, I began to walk in confidence and into the fullness of all that God had prepared for me.

    Throughout my journey, and even today, I am still learning that I needn’t be shy about what God has gifted me with and placed in my heart to do, because there is no competition in the Kingdom. God has given each of us gifts, not to bury and hide away, but to edify the body of Christ. We may not be the best, but let us be the best that we can be in our pursuit of God! He has something in store for each one of us in our journey of faith, so let us press forth, no need to pai-seh!

  • Blog
  • How to Be an Encourager

    By Alarice

    What kind of environment did you grow up in? What was your childhood like? Chances are, if you grew up in an Asian family, affirming and encouraging words may have been a rarity. In Asian culture, we tend to show our ‘love’ by pointing out the negatives in you rather than the positives, hoping that you will do better. The idea is that ‘tough love is better than no love’.  There is a silent expectation that if I don’t publicly or audibly express ‘I love you’, you should know because ‘I provide a roof over your head!’ Is this kingdom culture, though? Using fear as a form of motivation is never a good solution. It leads to emptiness, a perfectionist mindset, and a self-hatred when one fails to purge out these imperfections in their life.  Instead, we need to be releasing words of life and godly truth that call out and shape the destiny in people. Through our words, we are calling out the great army of God to fulfill their destiny in Christ across the earth! To do that, we must simply learn to start by being an encourager!

    Encouragement is a prophetic gift. I’m not talking about complimenting or flattery, for true encouragement is not self-seeking or motivated by an agenda; true encouragement chooses to see past flaws and instead calls out God’s destiny over the person’s life. It takes prophetic eyes to see what how God has originally designed the person, what gifts they operate in, and their unique contribution to the world.

    Words carry the power of life and death (Proverbs 18:21). It is how we access the spiritual realm. We get saved through HEARING the gospel! In the same way, wield your words like a weapon of warfare and ensure that you use it for the glory and kingdom of God! Here are 3 tips on how I’ve learned to be an encourager:

    1. Share with your brother and sister how they have been a blessing to you. Be as specific as possible. 
    2. What gift do you see in this person? (It can be a skill or a spiritual gift!)
    3. How do you see them using their gift to impact others?

    Once you learn to practise this natural act of simply being an encourager, you will soon find that it becomes supernatural! When the Spirit of wisdom and revelation comes upon you, God will reveal the secrets of His heart. Perhaps the Lord will download a vision or specific Bible verse to you for that person that will greatly strengthen them in their season!

    Remember as worshippers or even worship leaders, we are releasing songs that will encourage, exhort, and edify the church. Let us learn to be an encourager on and off the stage, using our words to lift up one another and the name of Jesus!

  • Blog
  • Discipleship: Where Do I Begin?

    By Calvin Hong & Shawn Wong

    ‘Disciple’. There are multiple times in the Bible where this word is mentioned. But what is the essential meaning of the word ‘disciple’? Quite simply, a disciple is a disciplined follower of Christ.

    In Jewish culture, where Rabbis (teachers of the law) are well-respected, the children would already be memorising the Torah, the first five books of the Bible, around the age of 8-10. Yet being a disciple is not just about reading the Bible, but being disciplined to live the life it describes. So what does it mean to be a disciple in our current day? Are we true followers of not just His teachings, but in how we choose to live our lives? Let’s explore this.

    ‘Now large crowds were going along with Him; and He turned and said to them, “If anyone comes to Me, and does not hate his own father and mother and wife and children and brothers and sisters, yes, and even his own life, he cannot be My disciple. Whoever does not carry his own cross and come after Me cannot be My disciple. For which one of you, when he wants to build a tower, does not first sit down and calculate the cost to see if he has enough to complete it?’

    (Luke 14:25-28)

    A Single-Minded Decision

    At events, in the midst of ‘large crowds’, people tend to get excited. The atmosphere, the lights, the music! But I love how the words of Jesus always cut right through all the hype and go straight to the heart. It may be easy to say ‘yes’ when everyone around you is doing so. When all the hype is stripped away, without the influence of crowds, how will you choose to live? Being a disciple means to single-mindedly dedicate yourself to follow Christ, without being tossed back and forth. Luke 9:62 says: ‘But Jesus said to him, “No one, after putting his hand to the plow and looking back, is fit for the kingdom of God.”’ It’s a firm decision; a decision that is your own to make, without regret (looking back). Know that it’s no longer about you or your preferences, but about complete obedience to God.

    Carrying Your Cross

    It’s interesting that Jesus mentioned the cross in this passage, even before His crucifixion. He was talking about the pain, suffering, humiliation, and sacrifices that may come upon giving God your ‘yes’. The Kingdom of God is not for the faint-hearted. To truly know Him, there are things we have to be willing to go through. Jesus made it clear for us so that there need not be any second-guessing; if we want to follow Him, there is a cost.

    Pain brings an understanding that there will be struggles, but also that our strength is not our own. Humanly, it’s impossible to live this life without the power of the Holy Spirit. Pain keeps us reliant on Him as the source of all our strength and ability – it refines and humbles us.

    Accountability to Spiritual Authority

    Godly governance is done in the context of Family. That’s why God implemented spiritual authority – our fathers and mothers, leaders, elders, etc. As we grow as disciples, it’s important that we maintain accountability to those in spiritual authority over us. Their authority is not given so they can rule over us, but to help us grow in maturity and teach us to obey the commandments in the Bible.

    So let’s ask ourselves: Am I willing to lay down my rights and agendas for His? Am I willing to turn away from my old lifestyle? Will our decision to follow be half-hearted or single-minded? Our responses to these questions will determine the trajectory of our discipleship journey.

  • Behind the Scenes
  • Coping with Despair: The Importance of Emotional Health

    By August Lai

    A number of years ago, I was diagnosed with a chronic auto-immune disease. At that time, I had been living what I considered a full life. I had a job which I found meaningful, was actively serving in church, plugged into a life group, and had just participated in a major musical production. I felt good about myself and excited for the future. Then one morning I awoke with severe double vision. It persisted, so I sought treatment for it. After weeks of doctors and tests, I was diagnosed with Myasthenia Gravis.

    In the initial weeks following my diagnosis, I propped up a brave front for everyone around me but behind that sat a bubbling cauldron of despair, anger, and sadness. I started avoiding my friends, withdrawing from my family, and I couldn’t concentrate at work.

    It was in the midst of this that I gave up trying to make sense of the disease. I was adrift in a storm at sea and I realised I was trying to control the weather! I could only turn to God. After weeks of wrangling, I was challenged to release all the control and plans I had over my life. It was as if every bit of control I gave up to God would be exchanged for a small piece of supernatural peace. Months passed before I could honestly declare to myself that my life truly belonged to God.

    In retrospect, one of the most challenging aspects was how this emotional roller-coaster affected my life. When my emotions were ragged and frayed, it was difficult to connect with others, rest well, make good decisions, and be rational. Emotional health is not a state in which there is a lack of stress or problems; rather it enables one to cope well when life unexpectedly takes a turn for the worse. Here are two lessons I learnt which I will hold close to my heart for the rest of my life.

    Community

    In times of crisis, we need others who are willing to come alongside us to share the burden for a season. That’s when friends and family with whom we have strong relationships will rise up in prayer and support; trusted leaders can offer sound counsel when we are too exhausted to make good decisions. Without a supportive network, even a small one, I would be mired all alone in my irrational thoughts and fears. An engaged community can encourage you to anchor daily upon the truth of God rather than despair. Proverbs 24:6 tells us, ‘For by wise guidance you can wage your war, and in abundance of counselors there is victory.’ Do not underestimate nor forsake the power and safety that comes with community!

    Identity

    Prior to the diagnosis, I had never seriously considered what it meant to be a child of God. I was not living from a position of surrender, so I would try to fix every problem I encountered with my own wisdom. Eventually I ran into a problem that all my wisdom could not fathom nor resolve, and I was forced to turn to the One higher than I. He then taught me about the heart of an Abba Father and I learnt how to be His child. I love this quote which goes like this: ‘God never promised us a storm-free, life but a storm-proof one.’ Within our relationship with Him can be found all we need to weather the storms of life – and it starts with knowing who we are in God! Isn’t that amazing? When we are assured about our God-given identity, we can then do what Hebrews 4:16 encourages us to: ‘Let us then with confidence draw near to the throne of grace, that we may receive mercy and find grace to help in time of need.’

    By God’s grace, I was eventually healed from my condition. I am grateful not only for my health but also for my purpose which He continues to uncover for my life. There is great value in tending to your inner life, ensuring that you are emotionally stable and secure in who you are. I pray that you will be blessed in your season and discover renewed strength from the revelation of His great love for you!

  • Blog
  • Dealing with Offence, the Number One Relationship Killer

    by Alarice

    Have you ever known a particular ‘easily-offended’ person whom, after a while, would consecutively get offended by every one of their friends and systematically start to cut them off from their circles of influence? It’s not long before you would see them completely isolated, offended by everyone – it becomes them against the world. 

    THIS is the NUMBER 1 strategy of the enemy to steal the abundant life that God has for us.  It says in John 10:10 that the ‘enemy comes to steal, kill and destroy’, and he loves to do this by sowing seeds of bitterness and offence that ultimately lead to the destruction of God-given relationships! Friends, our Christian life MUST be done in the context of relationship, community and family – it is the foundation of Heaven’s culture. There is so much richness to be found in doing life in community – it is where our callings and our identities are affirmed, where we are positioned to fulfil our destinies, and where we are sharpened and experience growth. It’s time we got smarter and realised the enemy’s schemes, learn to forgive, and let go of offence so that we can enjoy the abundance of being ‘set in a family’. 

    So how do we overcome offence? How the Lord has personally shown me, is to ask the Lord to give you a revelation of WHO that person is DESTINED TO BE. Sure, they may have flaws (we, too, have flaws), but it’s not to stumble over who they are not. Instead, we are to celebrate who they are! They are sons and daughters, God sent His Son for them, they are called to do great and mighty exploits in His name! Our struggle is not against flesh and blood, but against powers and principalities – we have a common enemy and it is NOT your neighbour. Ask the Lord to give you eyes to see the greatness in that person and you soon will find that you will be able to release your hurt and release that person into the fullness of their destiny in Christ.